Tag Archive | designer

Take Stock – or maybe not!

There’s a new Stock library revolution on the horizon. We’re all fed up with cheesy, staged photographs used in the corporate marketing world. The real, grassroots businesses – the local ones – are revolting! No, not in the disgusting sense, they’re merely turning their backs on happy family pics and sterotypes, they’re embracing real life imagery. That’s got to be a good thing.

When it comes to getting your business out there, why not have pictures of you doing your stuff. It makes sense right? Who is going to have faith in the carpenters who don’t have any photos of themselves with a hammer in their hand? Who’s going to hire the designer who can’t demonstrate their own design skills throught tangible examples of them in situ, at their computer using design software, in a client’s sitting room sorting out their interiors… you get the idea.

(Little bit of self indulgence! Photo taken by my daughter, she’s not a photographer, but I am a designer – you get the idea.)

Be done with the expensive stock library options that don’t represent your business, find yourself a good photographer. If they’re any good you’ll know because they’ll have a portfolio of happy clients with examples of their work. Make your job and your business appeal to a wider audience, show them that you and the work you do is real. 

Don’t get me wrong, stock libraries have their place, I use them myself and actually contribute to one of them (Adobe Stock). But when it comes to actually showing what you do, who better to be in the photos than you!

Game changer

When you find your life has all of a sudden taken an unexpected turn, it’s a bit tricky to be rational about choices and decisions. The first step to getting over this is to acknowledge when the irrational is merely a consequence of one’s situation and at that point, you need to grab it by the horns and battle the anxiety & angst head on.

One thing that I’ve learnt about myself over the last 20 years (from dealing with marriage, children, divorce, re-educating, new career, relationships, friendships…) is that you can never plan things, not really. Yes you can feel smug that you’ve got your diary filled with wonderful social events, meetings, work commitments and the odd holiday or weekend away; but when it comes to it, none of these are certain. Keeping an open mind about things not going quite to plan is a healthy way of dealing with life in general. If we’re too caught up with sticking to those diary entries, it becomes a relentless personal challenge to attempt perfection.

What’s so wrong about trying to get things right? Nothing, but sometimes it’s the getting things wrong that leads us to making better choices in the future. If we can come to terms with the mistakes that we make then we can learn from them and improve on the decision making process when faced with new challenges.

I love my work, but it’s not always as creative as I would like it to be. Recently I’ve realised that some of the work that I’ve been doing isn’t really challenging me in the way that allows me to grow my skills as a designer. It’s all about finding the balance and sometimes you have to say ‘no more’ and make that decision to change things. I did just that. I finished a job that was leading nowhere. When you look around, after three years, to find evidence of all your hard work and really can’t find it, you have to question whether your hard work is really what that business wants, despite what they  might need. Sometimes you have to deal with attitudes that are not prepared to accept that the world is changing, that they need to embrace those changes, enjoy them and reap the benefits. The penny finally dropped, I was wasting my time and energy, and my creativity was being stifled.

Time to exit. Time to move on. Time to think rationally and time to turn my life back around to a place that makes me happy and makes my kids happy. Looking after number one maybe a selfish thing to admit to, but it is necessary. My game changer moment has been a tough one, but certainly not something that I regret.

Being able to smile and laugh at life is sometimes a challenge, but one that should have a firm appointment in all our busy diaries. Have a damn good day!


 


 

Muse or WordPress?

After much frustration with the publishing side of Adobe Muse I’m thinking about switching entirely to using WordPress to build simple sites for my clients. The support from Adobe has been a hair-tearing time, waiting for their experts to come back to me with answers to questions takes far too long when you need to find an answer immediately. I’m bored with it and disappointed that Adobe haven’t thought about the post publishing side of things, considering Muse was set up to cater for those of us who do not want to worry about the nitty-gritty of coding etc.

When I first discovered Muse I thought all my dreams had come true, a web design package that allows me to be a designer not a techie. I wouldn’t have to worry about what goes on in the background, I could just concentrate on making my sites look good and work the way I want them to work. But when it comes to publishing it all reverts back to needing to be a whizz at all the background stuff. I simply don’t understand and I want answers quick. Yes I am a little impatient when things don’t work like they should.

I love the sites I’ve created with Muse and my clients have been really happy with them too, but the niggling little things that spoil the experience are pushing me away. Help me Adobe! If you’re going to create a package for us designers who don’t want to think about the coding side of life, give us the whole package.

Hello WordPress, I’m looking forward to becoming very friendly with you!ImageImageImage

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